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When Gmail first entered the email scene, you needed an invitation from a current user in order to create a new account. That has not been the case for some time, and now you can create an account by navigating to www.gmail.com and selecting the red “Create an Account” button in the top right corner of the screen. You can even create a second, third, or other account if you already have Gmail logins.

Completing New Account Information:

Once you click on the “Create New Account” button, you will see a screen for entering new account information. Information necessary to creating an account includes:

  • Name,
  • Username,
  • Password and password confirmation,
  • Birthday,
  • Gender,
  • Mobile phone number, and
  • Your current email address.

When creating a password, Google will provide some guidance on how strong the password is. The stronger the password is, the less likely someone will be able to guess it. You want to avoid using simple words, relative’s or pet’s names, birthdays, addresses or other easy to associate information.

You can set up an account without providing your mobile phone number and email address, but Google uses these contact methods in order to supply you with login information if you ever have problems signing in. It is advisable that you enter at least one of these items. The current email address you enter should not be for the email account you are in the process of creating.

To finalize your information entry, you will need to prove you are a real person by copying the funky text. It may look like the image below, and can be hard to read. You can use the two buttons indicated by the red circle in order to get assistance with a code you cannot read. The first button resets the image to a different set of words that may be easier to read. The second button provides an audio challenge where letters are read to you and you copy them into the box.

Finally, you will need to provide your country location and agree to Google’s terms of service. Note that there are two check boxes in the image below. You must review the terms of service and privacy policy, and then check box one in order to get a Gmail account. You can choose whether or not to select the box for personalizing other sites.

After clicking “Next Step”, you will receive a welcome message and a button to “Continue to Gmail”. When you log in for the first time, you may receive a dialogue box offering to let your friends know you have a new email address. If you select yes, Google will help you import contacts and send a blanket email. You can select “no thanks” to move directly to your inbox.

You will have a number of welcome emails from Gmail in your new inbox. You may want to save them as they have valuable contact information. Otherwise, you are ready to send and receive emails at your new inbox!

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